Influences: Lisa Congdon / Art Inc.

Lisa Congdon's new book has officially been added to my  Arts & Creatvity Bookshelf .

Lisa Congdon's new book has officially been added to my Arts & Creatvity Bookshelf.

Visit Lisa's website:  lisacongdon.com

Visit Lisa's website: lisacongdon.com

I've recently discovered Lisa Congdon, fine artist, illustrator, and author, and she's quickly becoming a big influence on my work. Lisa found her identity as an artist in her 30's and has built an amazingly successful career in the last 10-15 years or so through smart, hard, and dedicated work. 

She shares in-depth details of how you can make a living by making visual art in the book Art, Inc. (The Essential Guide for Building Your Career as an Artist)There is more practical guidance in this book than in most resources of a similar sort, which I expect I'll go back to and reference as needed. The design of the book is also excellent, which I appreciate as the book is indeed about art/design. (It only makes sense I suppose, but this is not always a given.) There are other books in the "Inc." series including Creative, Inc. , Blog, Inc. , Craft Inc. , and Mom, Inc.

Hear/see more about Lisa Congdon's life and work in the videos below:

Advent: Calling the Dreamers & Realists, Prophets & Pragmatists Alike

Advent, n.

  • The arrival of a notable person, thing or event
  • The first season of the Christian Church year, leading up to Christmas & including the 4 preceding Sundays
  • The coming or the second coming of Christ
An Advent wreath I put together for our community this year––one of my favorite symbols of the season, layered with meaning. In the shape of a circle to symbolize the eternal nature of God, in Whom there is no beginning nor end. Green to symbolize everlasting life and the exhaustless mercy of God. 3 purple candles that mark the weeks of fasting, mourning, waiting, longing. The 1 pink candle that marks our shift to rejoicing and celebrating the birth of the incarnate God. And finally, the 1 white candle in the center, the Christ candle, symbolizing the perfection and completion that is embodied in Jesus.

An Advent wreath I put together for our community this year––one of my favorite symbols of the season, layered with meaning. In the shape of a circle to symbolize the eternal nature of God, in Whom there is no beginning nor end. Green to symbolize everlasting life and the exhaustless mercy of God. 3 purple candles that mark the weeks of fasting, mourning, waiting, longing. The 1 pink candle that marks our shift to rejoicing and celebrating the birth of the incarnate God. And finally, the 1 white candle in the center, the Christ candle, symbolizing the perfection and completion that is embodied in Jesus.

And additionally...my favorite season of the year. Why? Maybe because it seems like the most realistic one to me. And I think that's a good foundation to start each new year on...a real one. Advent is the time when longing & unmet desires meet celebration & fulfillment, holding the 2 ends of the spectrum of our human experience in tension without denying either of them. Grief and hope, pain and joy together. Because honestly, how often are we not feeling both at the same time in some way?

Advent is a season of waiting, preparation, longing, and celebrating. Amidst the chaos that our Americanized, commercialized, consumeristic "Christmas" can pull us into, we're given an invitation as the community of God's people during Advent to say no to the noise. No to the busyness. No to the stress. No to the spending. 

We're invited to say yes to a counter-cultural quiet––silence even. Yes to slowing down rather than speeding up. Yes to spending less and in different places, so as not to feed the machine of unjust slave labor that our consumer culture breeds (especially this time of year). We're invited to prepare to remember in gratitude the first coming of Christ, to acknowledge the longings & struggles we need God to come for today, and to hope confidently as we wait for the second coming of Christ when all of creation will be restored and made right. Advent sets us in the past, present, and future all at once––in the fullness of time. Something about this helps us with the slowing of our paces, the realization of our smallness, and the wondering at a God who would choose to become human to prove to us we're not alone, that God is with us and understands, and to show us how to live in Love.

Advent is a time to listen to the prophets, to learn their language, and to adopt their eyes. A great Light has shown into the world, yes, but there is much darkness for it still to overcome. And there is much work for us to do in bringing the Light to bear on the places, people, and systems still desperately waiting on it. So we read Isaiah, Jeremiah, the Psalms of lament, and the Gospel stories to learn how to see and talk about what is still broken, what is still gruesomely unjust & wrong––all the while speaking hope & a better way into the people and places that need it. A better way of Love that leads us to hurt ourselves and each other less and that adds to the beauty rather than the brokenness. A better way that helps to make this world a home where every child, every person, every part of Creation can be safe and loved. We have good news...for our own hardened, hurting hearts. For our loneliness. For the light flickering inside us that we haven't seen or felt in some time. For the children in our neighborhood who are becoming parents so young. For the victims of hateful, non-sensical violence in Ferguson & all the other places around the world due to the lies of racism. For those trapped in the sex trade and other slave labor. For the child soldiers. For the adult soldiers. For those misunderstood or discriminated against because of their gender, sexual orientation, religion, race, etc. For those considering suicide. For the deceived. For the betrayed. For the addicted. For the migrants walking the desert into our country as I type, hundreds dying. For the countries they come from. For our country, and all we surely have to apologize for. For those on both sides of the imbalance of power in our world...both the oppressed and oppressors. For those who feel forgotten, alone, unseen, or unheard. And for countless others, we have the good news of a better way. We really can have peace when we remember that we belong to each other––that we make it together or we don't make it at all (as our new friend Pastor Randy, a modern-day Samaritan, says).

And the songs of Advent give us language to speak this good news of a better way to ourselves and each other. To sing of the beauty and wonder at it, trusting it to be true even if we can't imagine how that could be so at the moment...

Oh, come, Desire of nations, bind
In one the hearts of all mankind;
Oh, bid our sad divisions cease,
And be yourself our King of Peace.
Rejoice! Rejoice! Emmanuel
Shall come to you, O Israel!
— O Come O Come, Emmanuel
Truly He taught us to love one another,
His law is love and His gospel is peace.
Chains he shall break, for the slave is our brother.
And in his name all oppression shall cease.
Sweet hymns of joy in grateful chorus raise we,
With all our hearts we praise His holy name.
Christ is the Lord! Then ever, ever praise we,
His power and glory ever more proclaim!
His power and glory ever more proclaim!
— Oh Holy Night
No more let sins and sorrows grow
Nor thorns infest the ground
He comes to make
His blessings flow
Far as the curse is found
Far as the curse is found
Far as, far as the curse is found
— Joy to the World
O ye beneath life’s crushing load,
Whose forms are bending low,
Who toil along the climbing way
With painful steps and slow;
Look now, for glad and golden hours
Come swiftly on the wing;
Oh rest beside the weary road
And hear the angels sing.

For lo! the days are hastening on,
By prophets seen of old,
When with the ever-circling years
Shall come the time foretold,
When the new heaven and earth shall own
The Prince of Peace, their King,
And the whole world send back the song
Which now the angels sing.
— It Came Upon a Midnight Clear
And in despair I bowed my head
“There is no peace on earth,” I said,
“For hate is strong and mocks the song
Of peace on earth, good will to men.”

Then pealed the bells more loud and deep:
“God is not dead, nor doth He sleep;
The wrong shall fail, the right prevail
With peace on earth, good will to men.”
— I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day

Beauty.

1 of 2 Advent paintings that I made last year.  Click  to see/read more about them.

1 of 2 Advent paintings that I made last year. Click to see/read more about them.

The language of Advent is rich. It is real. It is raw. It is good news for all people. It is our past, our present, and our future. The Story invites us into itself that we would be compelled to participate and play our part in it. And it calls for all of us...the dreamers & prophets, realists & pragmatists alike. It is a time to look at the world and ourselves and be painfully honest about what we see. But we're not to stop there. We're to dream for the world with a holy imagination guided by the Spirit, and to put our hands to making those dreams reality in practical, tangible ways. If we accept the invitations of Advent, the season can be such a centering and generative one. Here are some things that folks are making/doing as they open themselves to the discipline of observing this season:

In closing, I'll just say that I've used words like "discipline" and "tension" for a reason. The ways of Advent are not easy amidst a culture set up for such a different way this season. They're not easy, but they are worth it. The way of freedom via limitations...saying our no's in the right places so that we may say our yes's rightly as well, experiencing the fruit that follows. I don't write as an expert or as a champion of these ways. If you notice, I'm only just now posting this on the 4th Sunday of Advent. Because even with the plan to slow down, prepare early, and listen during this time things can get out of hand. And they did for me this year. Unexpected problems with my apartment left me pretty mobile this month...hopping from house to house, pushed back deadlines on recording projects, last-minute packing and present-making before travel, and of course a sickness to fight in my body worn down from the frenzy. But even amidst the unexpected instability I've kept the Advent way in sight in small ways whenever possible, and am taking today to intentionally recenter as fully as possible. And I have to remember that my load, however awkwardly carried, is so light compared to what so many in the world are carrying at this time.

In the name of the One who is Mercy and Mystery, the One who comes with goodwill to earth and peace again for us all,

I wish you all a deep sense of that peace in this last week of Advent and a Merry Christmas in the days that follow.

-sd.

Influences: Scott Erickson

I appreciate when other artists give us glimpses into the influences that undergird the work they're making, so I've decided to periodically offer you those glimpses of the things that comprise my creative process. Hope it's interesting or helpful to you in some way!

If we've talked for any length of time about art and what artists I'm learning from, then I expect you've heard the name Scott Erickson. If we haven't gotten to have that conversation yet...well here it is! In brief anyway...

Scott Erickson is a visual artist who is currently living and working in Portland, OR, with his family. I first heard of Scott when he was in Houston working as the Artist-in-Residence at Ecclesia Church, where he was helping to create a visual culture largely through live-painting. And I was convinced of his brilliance when he did a series of abstract studio paintings to accompany Derek Webb's Feedback project–an instrumental, electronic, classically composed interpretation of the Lord's Prayer.

In addition to the paintings he makes, Scott writes and speaks vulnerably about life not only as an artist, but as a person in the world who wrestles with very real experiences of doubt & faith, depression, community & family life, finding a vocation & making a living, embracing the value of the mundane, making meaning of suffering, and more. I've encountered so much of myself in what Scott shares and makes, as have many other folks. It has been a formative, encouraging gift to engage what he shares of himself and I'm grateful in advance for all that is yet to come! You can see his work and read/hear his words by perusing scottericksonart.com.

One of my absolute favorite things Scott has put out is his recent one-man play called We Are Not Troubled Guests. I've watched it twice now, laughing and crying in equal doses. Both times just as grateful for his honesty and in awe of how quickly he can transition from flippant, irreverent humor to raw vulnerability and the deep kind of human insight. Watch it by clicking on the video thumbnail below and entering the password: guests. And read more about the process of creating it here.

It's a private video...(Password: guests)

We are not troubled guests in this world, and our journey isn’t to try to figure out how we belong. But to realize we’ve always belonged.
— Scott Erickson, We Are Not Troubled Guests

A heartfelt "thank you" to Scott for all you've shared and all you will in the future. In your own words, "Be brave & keep going." We'll all be better for it...

sd.

PLANT PAINTINGS!

These are 2 small paintings I recently did as gifts for our interns at the  Yellow House  to commemorate their first year together and the commitment they've made to stay and continue growing together :)

These are 2 small paintings I recently did as gifts for our interns at the Yellow House to commemorate their first year together and the commitment they've made to stay and continue growing together :)

One of the values we learned and internalized this year around the Yellow House is the importance of stability...of committing both to people and a place and staying put for the long haul. None of us came to value this easily, naturally, or before throwing a few "adult temper tantrums" (I'm kidding...kind of) as it is so counter-cultural these days, especially for us young adults. Whether you call it "on-the-road syndrome" (thanks, Jack Kerouac*), "the-grass-is-always-greener disorder," wanderlust, or just 20-something ambition...it's hard to deny that those of my generation typically more often have our eyes on the next exciting thing than the tangible here and now...the next text message, the next place, next job, next 3-month internship, next trip to the mountains, next relationship, and so on. When we can't even commit to a dinner offer because something better might come up (true story), we're missing the people we're "with" and they're missing us. When we can't stay in a lease agreement longer than 2.5 months (another true story), we're missing all that the neighborhood/city/state has to offer and surely not seeing the myriad of things we could offer to it.

A seminal book on all this planting business. It has surely challenged and formed us significantly. Check it out if you're curious!

A seminal book on all this planting business. It has surely challenged and formed us significantly. Check it out if you're curious!

I'm convinced this whole life thing is one big search for home. Home doesn't just happen. Home isn't going to randomly be found up one mountain or another, in that city with the cleanest water and organic produce on every corner, or in your dream apartment. Home is something we make...by showing up and being present where we are with the people around us. Home is both place and people. We can make home where we are. By committing and being committed to, and by result making a safe place to share life and all of ourselves with those around us.


This is the design that the above paintings were based on. Click the image to check out the Yellow House's online store for more prints and other products like this!

This is the design that the above paintings were based on. Click the image to check out the Yellow House's online store for more prints and other products like this!

Ok, that's a super short snippet of what we've been learning and trying to live out together here in Shreveport, here in Highland. Not everyone will be called to make home in Shreveport obviously, but I would venture to say that we are each made to do so somewhere with some community. Where is that for you? It won't be the "perfect" place because that just doesn't exist. It won't be with the perfect, conflict-free community because that's even less likely to exist. Could it be where you are now? If not, I hope for you, that place, and your future friends that you find it soon:) But could it be where you are? For us, that's Shreveport and Highland as I've said, and we've decided to plant here and trust that we'll grow...as individuals, as a family, with our (literal) neighbors and that as a result the block, neighborhood, city, and beyond will grow and change by extension. And we trust that there will plenty enough adventure along the way, as there surely have been already! 

Here's to finding the freedom in planting and flourishing in that life together...

sd.

*To clarify, no hard feelings toward Kerouac! In fact I'm fascinated by him, his work, and it's influence on culture. It's just a reality that part of that influence was contributing to this myth that freedom is found on the move.